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< Back to news 10 May, 2017

Revealed - the nation’s favourite hotel room design

Christopher Johnson, Beacon Design Services Manager discusses how guests are demanding the evolution of hotel bedroom design.

Recent research from Beacon Design Services (BDS) has revealed that when it comes to hotel rooms, the most popular design among guests is neutral contemporary, with 44% of Brits preferring a sleek and stylish look to more traditional designs. Compact contemporary design came in second, with 29% of hotel guests preferring a no frills and straightforward design that saves on space.

The least popular styles among hotel guests were country designs with tweed and wooden fixtures (10%), modern colourful rooms with bright décor (5%), boutique style with personal touches (5%) and classical design with high quality finishes (5%).

Christopher Johnson of BDS shares his advice and top tips for achieving the nation’s favourite hotel room design:

“The way that guests use hotel rooms is evolving. The requirement for a standard double bed with a pair of side tables is changing to one of multi-purpose furniture, areas for work and relaxation, and increased technology. However this does not mean that the modern hotel room has to be minimalist. The modern traveller is looking for a home away from home and through following these tips, you can create a contemporary hotel room design whilst maintaining a homely ambiance."

Pelham-House-Hotel-

1. Be up to date with your technology offering

Décor is very important in giving a room its style, however the level or age of the technology in the room can have a tremendous effect on how modern the room feels. Out-dated technology, such as CRT televisions, can instantly age an area by 10-15 years. There is an expectation on hoteliers to provide a certain level of modern convenience with smart TVs, digital control over lighting, temperature and entertainment desired as well as ways to charge mobile devices efficiently. Importantly, all of these amenities and features need to seamlessly integrate into the design of the room.

2. Neutral tones with a pop of colour

We are seeing the trend of natural, neutral colours and mixed metal finishes passing from the domestic market into the hospitality sector as customers seek that homely atmosphere. Rather than creating a bright interior, warmer colours and tones should be considered to provide a relaxing colour palette. Pastels are being used more regularly in hotel rooms, providing a feeling of sophistication and luxury. That doesn’t mean there isn’t a requirement for colour; an item in navy blue combines so well with sage, grey, cream, and coral. Small pops of colour in soft furnishings or statement pieces of bright furniture turn up the interest level in a hotel room, without being overwhelming.

3. Consider contemporary fabrics with your furniture

A contemporary design can be created through furniture with clean, simple lines. However, just as the shape of the furniture affects its style, so does the fabric. Furniture can easily be used to make a statement by utilising unexpected textures and colours. Upholstering a traditional armchair in a contemporary fabric can completely change its style. For instance, a button backed wingback armchair would look completely different in a non-traditional, bright, textured fabric.

4. Move away from patterns

Historically, a lot of hotels would have a number of different patterns and finishes across the property, creating an untidy, confused aesthetic.  These patterns are now being overlooked in favour of the wide range of textures available in the fabric market to cater for a more contemporary style. Try mixing the neutral interior with interesting fabrics such as slub effect silks, brushed velvets and rough linens so the focus is stimulating the guests’ sense of touch as well as sight.

5. Layer textiles for a balance between modern and homely

Although a contemporary design is favoured, it is still important to provide a hotel room that is a home away from home. As our survey suggests, guests are moving away from heavily patterned, cluttered hotel rooms and are looking for calmer, more simple interior design. Simply put, layering textiles is the key to creating a warm, well-designed space, and neutral colours allow you to create this space more easily. Scandinavians have had this design style for decades with their use of Hygge style, which is a huge trend at the moment.[1]

 

[1] http://freshome.com/2014/09/15/10-design-lessons-you-can-learn-from-scandinavian-interiors/